Midwest area investigators come together in St. Charles to take another look at the I-70 serial killer case

It is a case that has left investigators across the Midwest scratching their heads to this day: Who is the I-70/35 killer? Why did he go on a killing spree span
Published: Jan. 20, 2022 at 1:17 PM CST
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ST. CHARLES, Mo. (KMOV.com) - It is a case that has left investigators across the Midwest scratching their heads to this day: Who is the I-70/35 killer? Why did he go on a killing spree spanning from Indianapolis to Wichita? Could he still be alive today?

These are some of the questions that have brought those who have been involved since the very beginning of this case back in 1992, and newer faces to the case together today in St. Charles as part of a two-day conference examining the cases of six killings that span across five states.

“Hopefully, bring some peace to the families so that they have the closure of at least knowing the why and the who, because [it’s been] over 30 years and they haven’t had that,” said Detective Kelly Rhodes, with the St. Charles City Police.

News 4 has been extensively covering the I-70/35 serial killer case, which began on April 8 in Indianapolis when Robin Fuldauer was shot to death inside a Payless store. The killer continued The spree in Indiana, Missouri and Kansas, with his last known victim to be Sarah Blessing in Raytown, just outside Kansas City.

Yet, the case that had a lasting impact across the St. Louis area was that of 24-year-old Nancy Kitzmiller in May 1992. Kitzmiller was working at the Boot Village in St. Charles when the killer walked in and shot her. Detective Rhodes says she was only four when this case first rocked the Midwest.

“With the description that we have, it’s very possible that even though 30 years have gone by, it’s very likely that he could still be alive,” she said.

Rhodes is among the newer faces to hop on the investigation. She hopes to bring in a fresh set of eyes to Kitzmiller’s and the rest of the victim’s cases when she steps in as primary investigator after St. Charles City Police Detective Don Stepp retires. She believes law enforcement could get closer to solving this case because forensic technology has made significant advancements since 1992.

“We definitely have a lot more advanced ways of extracting DNA or just the forensics labs are much more advanced than they were 30 years ago, so we really hope to use that to our advantage,” said Rhodes.

“The victims are frozen in time,” said Wichita Police Detective Timothy Relph.

Relph was an officer back when Patricia Smith and Patricia Magers, two other victims of the killer, were found shot to death in a bridal store in Wichita.

“It’s great to see the younger generation has kind of mixed in with some of the gentlemen who have been here a while because that’s what’s going to keep the case from just becoming a part of history,” said Relph.

Investigators spent the day in a conference room at the Ameristar Casino Resort Spa combing through case files alongside forensics experts, the FBI and other agencies. Relph says by bringing this case back into the spotlight, they hope the public can also help them identify new leads on where the killer went.

“Because one sighting in one location isn’t that exciting until you match it to another person identifying the same person in a different jurisdiction,” said Relph. “That’s what you’re hoping for. Some kind of connection because Indianapolis and Wichita are a long way away…and I think his travels had a reason.”

Investigators also hope that by joining heads with departments across different municipalities impacted by these cases, they are also showing the families of the victims they have not given up in the search for closure and justice.

If you have any tips in the investigation into the I-70/35 killer, you are urged to call 1-800-800-3510 or go to www.stcharlescitymo.gov and click on Crime Maps where there is a link to the I-70 Serial Killer. Tipsters can remain anonymous.ST. CHARLES, Mo. (KMOV.com) - It is a case that has left investigators across the Midwest scratching their heads to this day: Who is the I-70/35 killer? Why did he go on a killing spree spanning from Indianapolis to Wichita? Could he still be alive today?

These are some of the questions that have brought those who have been involved since the very beginning of this case back in 1992, and newer faces to the case together today in St. Charles as part of a two-day conference examining the cases of six killings that span across five states.

“Hopefully, bring some peace to the families so that they have the closure of at least knowing the why and the who, because [it’s been] over 30 years and they haven’t had that,” said Detective Kelly Rhodes, with the St. Charles City Police.

News 4 has been extensively covering the I-70/35 serial killer case, which began on April 8 in Indianapolis when Robin Fuldauer was shot to death inside a Payless store. The killer continued The spree in Indiana, Missouri and Kansas, with his last known victim to be Sarah Blessing in Raytown, just outside Kansas City.

Yet, the case that had a lasting impact across the St. Louis area was that of 24-year-old Nancy Kitzmiller in May 1992. Kitzmiller was working at the Boot Village in St. Charles when the killer walked in and shot her. Detective Rhodes says she was only four when this case first rocked the Midwest.

“With the description that we have, it’s very possible that even though 30 years have gone by, it’s very likely that he could still be alive,” she said.

Rhodes is among the newer faces to hop on the investigation. She hopes to bring in a fresh set of eyes to Kitzmiller’s and the rest of the victim’s cases when she steps in as primary investigator after St. Charles City Police Detective Don Stepp retires. She believes law enforcement could get closer to solving this case because forensic technology has made significant advancements since 1992.

“We definitely have a lot more advanced ways of extracting DNA or just the forensics labs are much more advanced than they were 30 years ago, so we really hope to use that to our advantage,” said Rhodes.

“The victims are frozen in time,” said Wichita Police Detective Timothy Relph.

Relph was an officer back when Patricia Smith and Patricia Magers, two other victims of the killer, were found shot to death in a bridal store in Wichita.

“It’s great to see the younger generation has kind of mixed in with some of the gentlemen who have been here a while because that’s what’s going to keep the case from just becoming a part of history,” said Relph.

Investigators spent the day in a conference room at the Ameristar Casino Resort Spa combing through case files alongside forensics experts, the FBI and other agencies. Relph says by bringing this case back into the spotlight, they hope the public can also help them identify new leads on where the killer went.

“Because one sighting in one location isn’t that exciting until you match it to another person identifying the same person in a different jurisdiction,” said Relph. “That’s what you’re hoping for. Some kind of connection because Indianapolis and Wichita are a long way away…and I think his travels had a reason.”

Investigators also hope that by joining heads with departments across different municipalities impacted by these cases, they are also showing the families of the victims they have not given up in the search for closure and justice.

If you have any tips in the investigation into the I-70/35 killer, you are urged to call 1-800-800-3510 or go to www.stcharlescitymo.gov and click on Crime Maps where there is a link to the I-70 Serial Killer. Tipsters can remain anonymous.