St. Louis police open probe into private investigator in Greiten - KMOV.com

St. Louis police open probe into private investigator in Greitens case

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(Credit: KMOV) (Credit: KMOV)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP/KMOV.com) -- Police are opening an investigation into the conduct of a private investigator hired by the Circuit Attorney’s Office for the invasion of privacy investigation into Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

Two attorneys for Greitens, Ed Dowd and Scott Rosenblum, went by police headquarters to make a complaint to police on Tuesday afternoon.

The Greitens legal team alleges that Tisaby committed perjury and they have been critical of how Gardner and her office have handled the investigation.

Greitens had been accused of taking a picture of a woman he was having an affair with in a compromising position and threatening to share it if she spoke about the affair. He has denied wrongdoing.

An attorney for Tisaby said he is being labeled a "scapegoat."

Attorney Jermaine Wooten said Tuesday that private investigator William Tisaby did nothing wrong. Greitens' lawyers claim the St. Louis prosecutor's office allowed Tisaby to commit perjury and withhold evidence from defense attorneys.

The Circuit Attorney's Office released the following statement:

The continued theatrics from Governor Greitens and his defense team today should surprise no one. 

I knew when I began investigating the Governor that his high-priced defense team would use whatever means possible to attack my team and me in court and through the media.  How did I know?  Twice Governor Greitens’ team of attorneys came to my office and threatened my staff and me with the continued barrage of insults and accusations if we continued to pursue charges against the Governor. 

As Circuit Attorney, I am responsible for following the evidence to seek the truth, wherever it may lead.  Sometimes the evidence leads us to hold public officials and powerful people accountable under the law, and that makes them uncomfortable. Often times, powerful people use whatever financial means available to stop prosecutors from seeking the truth.  This is not the first time (nor will it be the last) in American history when an elected official was under investigation and they attacked the investigation itself to redirect the focus from their client to something else. 

What is happening here in Missouri also mirrors what is happening on a national level.  Thankfully, the elected officials in Missouri have the courage to stand up for truth and for what is right, regardless of how messy things can get.

The actions by the defense team today do not concern me. There is not one shred of evidence that any action by Mr. Tisaby was illegal or materially impacted any evidence in this crime. There is also no evidence that Mr. Tisaby was anything other than mistaken or confused during his deposition when he answered the questions improperly. 

Just as Governor Greitens did not want anyone to conclude that he was guilty if he refused to take the stand during the trial, Mr. Tisaby’s reluctance to answer questions during his second deposition was merely due to the fact he had not been given the opportunity to review his previous deposition, which all witnesses are legally allowed to do.    

2:30 p.m.

An attorney for an investigator under fire in the now-dismissed criminal case against Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens says his client is being used as a "scapegoat."

Attorney Jermaine Wooten said Tuesday that private investigator William Tisaby did nothing wrong. Greitens' lawyers claim the St. Louis prosecutor's office allowed Tisaby to commit perjury and withhold evidence from defense attorneys.

Prosecutors on Monday dismissed a felony invasion-of-privacy charge against Grietens after a court ruled that St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner had to answer questions under oath from Greitens' attorneys.

Wooten calls Tisaby "an honest and decent man" who was just doing his job.

Gardner's office has said the charge stemming from Greitens' 2015 extramarital affair will be refiled by a special prosecutor or an assistant in her office.

12:30 p.m.

Attorneys for Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens say they'll ask police to look into alleged misconduct by the St. Louis prosecutor's office in the handling of a felony charge against the governor.

Greitens' attorney Ed Dowd said the defense team will be filing a report Tuesday with the St. Louis police department about the alleged misconduct.

Prosecutors dropped a felony invasion-of-privacy charge against Greitens on Monday after a court ruled that prosecutor Kim Gardner had to answer questions under oath from Greitens' attorneys. Greitens' lawyers claim Gardner allowed a private investigator to commit perjury and withhold evidence from defense attorneys.

Gardner's office has said the charge stemming from Greitens' 2015 extramarital affair be refiled by a special prosecutor or an assistant in her office.

8:50 a.m.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens no longer faces a felony charge stemming from an affair, but a legislative committee is pushing forward with its own investigation into the Republican governor.

On Tuesday, a House investigatory committee decided to call Greitens policy director Will Scharf as a witness. The panel wants to ask him about a memo he wrote in July 2016 about an apparent plan to funnel money to Greitens' campaign from anonymous donors.

At the time, Scharf was working for Catherine Hanaway, a rival in the Republican primary who now is an attorney for Greitens' campaign.

The panel also released a document Tuesday showing Greitens' political aides had discussed setting up a fundraising committee as soon as December 2014, two months before Greitens actually did so.

12 a.m.

Attorneys for Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens say the felony invasion-of-privacy case against him was crumbling under a lack of evidence and they doubt any charge will be refiled.

But the St. Louis circuit attorney's office says it still plans to pursue the case, either through a special prosecutor or an appointed assistant.

Prosecutors alleged Greitens took a revealing photo of a woman with whom he has acknowledged having an affair. They dropped the charge Monday.

The Republican still faces other problems. Missouri's Republican legislative leaders say they still will convene Friday in a monthlong special session to consider whether to impeach Greitens.

Greitens also remains charged with a felony in St. Louis for allegedly disclosing a donor list from a veterans' charity he founded for use in his political campaign.

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