St. Louis high school student garnering national attention for h - KMOV.com

St. Louis high school student garnering national attention for her activism against gun violence

Posted: Updated:
At 13, Kenidra Woods was inspired by the protests in Ferguson, but at 17, the shooting in Parkland sparked a fire inside of her. (Credit: KMOV) At 13, Kenidra Woods was inspired by the protests in Ferguson, but at 17, the shooting in Parkland sparked a fire inside of her. (Credit: KMOV)

ST. LOUIS (KMOV.com) – Kenidra Woods isn’t your typical high school junior. With 24,000 twitter followers, a feature in Teen Vogue, and an upcoming event called Hope for Humanity, Woods is becoming a national voice standing up against gun violence.

At 13, she was inspired by the protests in Ferguson, but at 17, the shooting in Parkland sparked a fire inside of her.

She says her activism started after Mike Brown was killed by a Ferguson Police officer, but now she has found her voice.

“You have to listen to me, I’m demanding you to listen to me,” said Woods.

A junior at Riverview Gardens High School, she organized a walk out at her high school. She then marched in DC at the March for Our Lives, where she met Emma Gonzalez, one of the survivors of Parkland.

“The main thing in common is gun violence,” said Woods.

Woods said she’s well aware school shootings aren’t the only things stealing the lives of today’s young people. The gun violence in her hometown in north St. Louis County is just as important to speak up about and out against.

“We have to take care of our inner community first. While we protest gun violence and police and other school shootings, we have to make sure we’re right and taking care of our people and not killing them,” said Woods.

She knows there are no easy answers. But using her voice at school and on a national stage, she believes change can happen.

“This generation is rising up above like something I’ve never seen before and I’m so hopeful for that,” she said.

50 years since the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Woods believes her generation can carry on that sense of activism.

“We’re a special kind of generation,” said Woods. “The ultimate we are fighting for is world peace that’s what Martin Luther King was about.”

Her next step is organizing an event with the youth advocacy organization she started, Hope for Humanity, Students Stand Up. She hopes to host an event that can act as a forum and conference for young people to learn how they can make a difference.

Powered by Frankly