First African-American portrait in Missouri history displayed at - KMOV.com

First African-American portrait in Missouri history displayed at Governor’s Mansion

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Governor Eric Greitens announced for the first time ever in Missouri history a portrait of an African-American will be displayed at the Governor’s Mansion. (Credit: Joanna Reid) Governor Eric Greitens announced for the first time ever in Missouri history a portrait of an African-American will be displayed at the Governor’s Mansion. (Credit: Joanna Reid)
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (KMOV.com) -

Governor Eric Greitens announced for the first time ever in Missouri history a portrait of an African-American will be displayed at the Governor’s Mansion.

George Washington Carver’s portrait painted by a Missouri artist, Joanna Reid will hang in the dining room of the Governor’s Mansion.

“We hang this portrait today because George Washington Carver is one of us. He is a Missourian who came from very little, went very far, and left our country better for his time on Earth,” said Greitens.

Carver began his life as a slave and was honored by Presidents and Kings for his work feeding people and fixing arms.

“By creating a color image of George Washington Carver, I hoped to make his story and persona more real for this generation,” said Joanna Reid.

The portrait will be presented at a Black History Month reception hosted by the Governor and First Lady. The public may view the portrait starting tomorrow during normal touring hours.

Tours of the Governor’s Mansion are available from 10 a.m to 1:45 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. For groups larger than 10, a reservation should be made.

For more information, click here.

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