St. Louis Public Safety Director speaks about crime on Martin Lu - KMOV.com

St. Louis Public Safety Director speaks about crime on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

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St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards speaks at a Martin Luther King, Jr. Day event on Monday. Credit: KMOV St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards speaks at a Martin Luther King, Jr. Day event on Monday. Credit: KMOV
ST. LOUIS, Mo. (KMOV.com) -

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s message is being carried forward in St. Louis on Martin Luther King Day. But, the city's public safety director is using the civil rights leader's birthday to make a plea.

Jimmie Edwards asked blacks to stop killing blacks. Police in St. Louis un-rolled yellow tape in neighborhoods all over our city for more than 200 murders. Almost every time, Edwards says, a black person was dead and a black person was accused.

Many have heard of black-on-black crime, but Leo Adams knows it.

"I am hurt. I am always hurt when I hear of black-on-black crime, but understand it," said Adams.

He believes environment and culture are part of the problem.

"It's not an excuse. It is still not right. All that killing of another person and taking someone's life? That is not right," added Adams.

Edwards spoke to a crowd, especially blacks during an MLK Day event, saying it's time to come together.

"We cannot go forward and continue King's dream if we don't look in the mirror and address that problem," said Edwards

He added nearly 100 percent of those accused and arrested were black.

"That's a problem that is on us. We have to fix that problem, and in order to fix that problem, you have to stand with us," added Edwards.

Black-on-black crime last week made a young man Frank Gill watched grow up become a statistic.

He's not sure it will ever stop.

"You kill that person, someone from that person's family is going to come kill you and a person is going to kill that person once they find out," said Gill.

A 30-year-old black man believes one way to start is with black men standing up.

"There are not a lot of males in the family. There are a lot of single-mother families. A lot of males are either dead, locked up or just not around. So you don't have the people to teach you how to do certain things," added Adams.

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