Want to help your child avoid a peanut allergy? The FDA has some - KMOV.com

Want to help your child avoid a peanut allergy? The FDA has some new ideas

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(Meredith) (Meredith)

(MEREDITH) -- Peanut allergies are one of the most common and dangerous food allergies among children.  According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, about two percent of children in the U.S. are allergic to peanuts.

Concerns over allergic reactions have prompted many parents to avoid feeding infants foods containing peanuts, and now the FDA says new research suggests that may actually make the problem worse.

A single clinical trial by the National Institutes of Health found that children with severe eczema and egg allergies who were given foods containing peanuts as early as four months of age had their risk of developing peanut allergies later in childhood reduced by 80 percent.

The FDA hopes this new information can better inform parents who hope to avoid long term allergy concerns for their child.

In a statement on Thursday, the FDA announced it would update labels on some infant foods that contain ground peanut or peanut residue to include the following message:

“For most infants with severe eczema and/or egg allergy who are already eating solid foods, introducing foods containing ground peanuts between four and 10 months of age and continuing consumption may reduce the risk of developing peanut allergy by five years of age.”

The new labeling will recommend checking with the infant’s healthcare provider first before introducing peanuts.

An important note, though. The FDA strongly recommends against giving infants peanuts as those can be choking hazards.

The FDA says it will continue to monitor food allergies and update parents and healthcare with new information as it becomes available. This is the first time the FDA has issued a qualified health claim focused on preventing food allergies.

Click Here for more on the New Rules of Introducing Peanuts

Click Here for Smart Ways to Introduce Your Baby to Nuts

Copyright 2017 Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. 

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