Schumer calls on FDA to regulate 'snortable chocolate' - KMOV.com

Schumer calls on FDA to regulate 'snortable chocolate'

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Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y. accompanied by Senate Minority Whip Richard Durbin of Ill., right, speaks to reporters after GOP leadership announce they are delaying a vote on the Republican health care bill, at the Capitol in Washingto Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y. accompanied by Senate Minority Whip Richard Durbin of Ill., right, speaks to reporters after GOP leadership announce they are delaying a vote on the Republican health care bill, at the Capitol in Washingto

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is urging federal regulators to look into a "snortable chocolate" powder, saying he's worried that it could prove harmful and is being marketed like a drug.

In a letter Saturday, the New York Democrat asked the Food and Drug Administration to investigate the use of caffeine in inhalable food products such as so-called Coco Loko. It's gotten buzz in recent weeks.

Schumer, the Senate minority leader, says there are too many unanswered questions about a product pitched under the innocent-sounding name of chocolate.

"This suspect product has no clear health value," he said in a statement. "I can't think of a single parent who thinks it is a good idea for their children to be snorting over-the-counter stimulants up their noses."

Marketed as "raw cacao snuff," Coco Loko includes cacao powder, which comes from beans used in making chocolate; they contain some caffeine. Manufacturer Legal Lean Co. doesn't detail other ingredients online, but according to news reports, Coco Loko also includes common energy-drink ingredients.

It promises feelings of well-being, mental focus, ecstasy-like euphoria and a rush of "motivation that is great for partygoers to dance the night away without a crash," according to Orlando, Florida-based Legal Lean's website. It notes that the claims haven't been vetted by the FDA.

The agency has said it hasn't yet determined whether it has authority to regulate snortable chocolate.

Legal Lean Co., which sells Coco Loko online for $19.99 for a 1.25-ounce (3.5-gram) tin, did not return a call seeking comment. Founder Nick Anderson has said he didn't consult any medical professionals but believes Coco Loko is safe. He said he developed it from snortable chocolate that's circulated in Europe in recent years.

"There's really no negative publicity, so I felt we're good to go," he told ABC's "Good Morning America" on Thursday.

Doctors have said they're not certain what the effects of inhaling chocolate might be.

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