No Trespassing: Warren Co. residents fed up with trespassers on - KMOV.com

No Trespassing: Warren Co. residents fed up with trespassers on their property

Posted: Updated:
People are driving from miles away to go swimming, fishing, even driving off road vehicles in the creeks and streams located on private property without permission. (Credit: KMOV) People are driving from miles away to go swimming, fishing, even driving off road vehicles in the creeks and streams located on private property without permission. (Credit: KMOV)
Parts of Warren County are so beautiful, the allure is understandable, but the problem lies when people think nothing of trespassing. (Credit: KMOV) Parts of Warren County are so beautiful, the allure is understandable, but the problem lies when people think nothing of trespassing. (Credit: KMOV)
WARREN CO. (KMOV.com) -

Residents in Warren County, Mo. are dealing with a trespassing problem.

People are driving from miles away to go swimming, fishing, even driving off-road vehicles in the creeks and streams located on private property without permission.

"They'll park on the road and just go in, ya know," said Ryan Engemann, a resident of Warren County.

Engemann's family owns about 200 acres with a creek running right through the property.

Parts of Warren County are so beautiful, the allure is understandable, but the problem lies when people think nothing of trespassing.

"Some people say, 'I'm sorry,' others don't care, you'll leave and come back and they're still there," said Engemann. "Call the police, they deal with them, it's a problem."

Property owners say the trespassers leave behind trash and unattended fires.

Jeff Edwan happens to be a Warren County property owner and a fire marshal with the Ferguson Fire Department, and he's particularly sensitive about people leaving unattended fires.

"They come from all over," said Edwan. "Columbia, Bowling Green, Missouri and show up in Warren County to swim in creek holes."

Trespassers have been known to use bold maneuvers to get to the creeks.  For example, they'll cut fencing, leave gates open, even drive through farmer's fields.

Some owners have letters on file with the sheriff's department making it clear they wish to prosecute trespassers.

Edwan has been to court with violators before.

"I would say a majority of them are friendly and understanding, they always say, 'we didn't know,' we've had a few tell us, 'no they're allowed to be in the creek,' and we've had some discussions about that," said Edwan.

As bad as the problem is throughout the summer, things get worse around the holidays such as Memorial Day, July 4, and Labor Day.

Copyright 2017 KMOV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly