Crews move home to make room for new NGA campus - KMOV.com

Crews move home to make room for new NGA campus

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Charlesetta Taylor’s century old home is being moved, instead of demolished to make room for the NGA's new campus in north St. Louis. Credit: KMOV Charlesetta Taylor’s century old home is being moved, instead of demolished to make room for the NGA's new campus in north St. Louis. Credit: KMOV
NORTH ST. LOUIS (KMOV.com) -

Crews started to move a century-old home from its original location Wednesday to help make room for the new National Geospatial Agency (NGA) campus in north St. Louis.

Charlesetta Taylor’s 7,500 square foot home is being moved .7 miles from north Market Street to a corner lot on St. Louis Avenue, where crews are working on a new foundation.

City officials said they wanted to move Taylor’s historic home rather than tear it down and pay Taylor to move. The cost to move the home is around $245,000.

“Essentially, the cost of moving the house is almost equal to the value would have been to give her a settlement,” said Otis Williams with the St. Louis Development Corporation.

“It is exciting just seeing the process. We are thrilled the house won’t be demolished,” said Taylor.

In March, 201,6 the head of the NGA recommended that the agency choose a site in north St. Louis for a new facility over a site near Scott Air Force Base.  The agency was looking for a new facility to replace its current campus in Soulard. Many residents of the North City neighborhood where the NGA is relocating to have said they do not want to move.

“We felt like we lost the battle because the NGA is coming here, but the war has been won because my house has been saved,” said Taylor.

Just a few blocks away is the old Buster Brown Show Factory, right on the edge of the NGA site.  The building’s owner, Jim Osher, said he wants to move the 85,000 square foot structure across the street and turn it into a hotel.

“Of course it is a lot of work, but it is not that impossible,” said Osher.

He said he believes tearing the abandoned factory down and constructing a new building for a hotel would cost up to $14 million. However, he believes simply moving the old factory would only cost around $5 million.

City officials say moving the old shoe factory is not feasible and added it is paying for it to be demolished.

Taylor’s home will remain in the middle of the 2500 block of north Market Street until February 26 when it will be moved to its new location.

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