Halloween can be the scariest thing for kids with food allergies - KMOV.com

Halloween can be the scariest thing for kids with food allergies

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Children queue up for candies and sweets in the annual "Trick or Treat" tradition on Halloween Monday, Oct. 31, 2011 at a subdivision at the financial district of Makati city east of Manila, Philippines. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez) Children queue up for candies and sweets in the annual "Trick or Treat" tradition on Halloween Monday, Oct. 31, 2011 at a subdivision at the financial district of Makati city east of Manila, Philippines. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
ST. LOUIS, Mo. (KMOV.com) -

Doctors are sending out a warning to parents with children dealing with food allergies for Halloween weekend.

Retailers are expected to sell 600 million pounds of candy for Halloween. With a lot of candy up for grabs, some kids might get their hands on some with milk, eggs, and peanuts - food allergies common in children.

Lila Kertz, a pediatric nurse practitioner with St. Louis Children’s Hospital, said allergies can be dangerous. Allergic reactions can range from a simple rash to difficulty breathing.

“Even old candies you're familiar with, you should always be reading the labels to make sure there aren't any new ingredients in anything that the child is consuming,” said Kertz. “Whether it's something you're familiar with or something new to the market, always read food labels it the safest thing for your child.”

Read: News 4 producer shares scary story of son’s allergic reaction

Kertz said most kids are diagnosed with allergies as toddlers.

If you're handing out candy and not familiar with food allergies, it is recommended you have different types of treats for the little superheroes with allergies who might knock on your door this weekend.

Once you get home from trick-or-treating, medical experts recommend dumping all the candy on the floor and reading every single candle wrapper for al list of ingredients. 

"Laffy Taffy is one that can contain egg, not every type of Laffy Taffy does, so there might be a false sense of security thinking this is OK for my child to eat, but indeed it might not be if it's one of  those flavors or varieties that does have egg in it," said Kertz.

The Teal Pumpkin Project helps parents know what houses are handing out allergy-free treats to kids. It's a nationwide project to give alternative option to kids with allergies.  

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