How the final debate stacks up against Washington U's debate - KMOV.com

How the final debate stacks up against Washington U's debate

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Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (L) and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump listen during the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri.  Photo by Saul Loeb-Pool Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (L) and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump listen during the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri. Photo by Saul Loeb-Pool
CLAYTON (KMOV.com) -

Undecided voters will get one last look at their two leading candidates for president Wednesday night when Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton take the debate stage in Las Vegas. It wasn't long ago that St. Louis was in the national limelight, as it hosted the second presidential debate. There will be similarities between the two, but also stark differences.

Washington University planned for months to host the two major political parties and more than 3,000 journalists. Security was extensive, with local police teaming up with the Secret Service to pull off a safe event. Similar preparations are underway at University of Nevada - Las Vegas (UNLV). The university will set aside a "public expression zone," just like Washington University did on October 9th.

There will be one key different between the two debates. When Washington University hosted, it was a town hall format, with undecided voters asking some of the questions. The debate at UNLV will be exactly the same as the first one, which was back in September at Hofstra University. The debate will be divided into six segments with the moderators leading the topics. 

Some political experts think it could get even uglier than the town hall style debate, especially since tonight's debate is in a key swing state.

"From Trump, I think he will literally throw everything in the kitchen sink at Hillary, ranging from more talk of accusers against Bill Clinton to conspiracy theories," said Dr. Jacob Thompson, UNLV professor and debate coach.

When the debate was at Washington University, the hot topic heading into the night was the leaked audio recording in which Trump was caught making vulgar comments about women.  Now, he is trying to shift attention to what he is calling a rigged election.

"People that have died 10 years ago are still voting," said Trump. "Illegal immigrants are voting. I mean, where are the street smarts of some of these politicians? They don't have any is right. So many cities are corrupt and voter fraud is very, very common."

At one point, Trump specifically mentioned St. Louis so News 4 wanted to take a closer look at what checks and balances are in place. The director of the St. Louis County Elections Board said each party has the right to designate a "challenger," which is basically an observer at each polling place.

Nationally, President Obama is noting how decentralized elections are and the sheer number of votes involved. President Obama had harsh words for Trump, telling him to stop whining.

"If whenever things are going badly for you and you lose, you start blaming somebody else, then you don't have what it takes to be in this job," said President Obama.

Right before the Washington University debate, Trump made headlines by appearing with a panel of women who accused Bill Clinton of sexual misconduct.  Guests for both parties will likely raise eyebrows again tonight because Trump plans to bring the Kenyan-born half-brother of President Obama and Clinton is slated to invite billionaire Mark Cuban.

While Trump tries to redirect the conversation, Clinton is finding herself in the middle of another e-mail scandal. Wikileaks released a new round of emails that show her campaign leaders making fun of the Catholic faith. Now, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who is from St. Louis, is responding.

"If it had been said about the Jewish community, the Islamic community, within ten minutes there would have been an apology and a complete distancing from those remarks, which hasn't happened yet," said Dolan who is now with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. Dolan went on to say he has met with Clinton and admired her commitment to religious freedom around the world, but he still hopes she distances herself from campaign leaders involved in the e-mail chain. Dolan stopped short of endorsing either candidate.

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