Dash cam video offers new perspective on 2011 officer-involved s - KMOV.com

Dash cam video offers new perspective on 2011 officer-involved shooting

Posted: Updated:
Dash cam video from an officer-involved shooting in 2011 is offering a new perspective on the incident. Former St. Louis officer Jason Stockley is charged in the case. Credit: Anonymous Dash cam video from an officer-involved shooting in 2011 is offering a new perspective on the incident. Former St. Louis officer Jason Stockley is charged in the case. Credit: Anonymous
Former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley is charged with first-degree murder following a fatal shooting on December 20, 2011 (Credit: Harris County Sheriff's Office) Former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley is charged with first-degree murder following a fatal shooting on December 20, 2011 (Credit: Harris County Sheriff's Office)
ST. LOUIS, Mo. (KMOV.com) -

Video obtained by News 4 is revealing disturbing details of an officer-involved shooting from 2011.

A former St. Louis police officer is charged with murder in the case, but the videos are offering a new perspective to the public of what happened. However, how the video came to light is raising major new questions about the officer's upcoming trial.

Investigative Reporter Lauren Trager obtained a copy through an anonymous source, who got it from someone else.

Prosecutors say the video, along with other evidence, shows that Jason Stockley murdered Anthony Lamar Smith.

The police car dash camera video isn't the best quality. It starts at the Church’s Chicken at Riverview and Thekla in December, 2011. The officers had stopped a car in a suspected drug deal.

In the video, you can see Stockley exit the police cruiser. In his hand is his own personal weapon, an AK-47. Having this particular gun is a violation of department policy.

He raises his hand to a car coming towards him, then points the AK-47 at the car.

As the car drives away, Stockley then pulls his department issued weapon and fires it.

Then he runs back to the police cruiser, and he and the officer driving the police vehicle take chase at high rates of speed.

At one point, they crash into a tree, but continue to pursue the car.

You can hear the officers yelling. Prosecutors say at one point, Stockley says, "going to kill this expletive!"

Several minutes later, the cruiser catches up with the white car and the police officer driving rams the cruiser into it.

Stockley and his partner are then seen rushing up to the car. Moments later is when prosecutors say Stockley shot five times, striking the car's driver, Anthony Lamar Smith, killing him.

At issue, in part, is exactly what Stockley does after the shooting.

He puts the AK-47 in the backseat of the car. Then, just a short time later, comes back and appears to dig into a bag. But it's difficult to see what, if anything, he grabs, because his body covers it up.

Questions also remain about a gun recovered in Smith's car.

According to court documents, Stockley's was the only DNA found on the gun. However the police union says that doesn't prove Stockley planted it. 

A source tells News 4 that ballistics confirm that Stockley only ever shot his department-issued weapon, not the AK-47.

Jeff Roorda, who is with the St. Louis Police Officers’ Association, said releasing the video will make it difficult for Stockley to get a fair trial.

“The federal judge has issued an order preventing it from being released. It has no evidentiary value, but it does have emotional value to potential jurors. I think this is all done to sabotage a jury pool,” said Roorda.

Attorney Al Watkins, who represented Smith’s daughter in a lawsuit against the City of St. Louis, said it is very important the video was released.

“It is of even greater importance that a video like this reaches the public eye, that the public is able to see and discern for themselves what’s gone on,” said Watkins.

The St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s Office released the following statement on the video:

While we understand there is a lot of public interest in this case, our prosecutors must focus their efforts on pursuing this case in a court of law and not in the media. 

Regarding Mr. Stockley’s request for a change of venue, these requests are common in high-profile cases like this and rarely granted. Judges take seriously a particular community’s right to determine whether the state has proven its case beyond a reasonable doubt. The law specifically requires a trial in the location where the crime is alleged to occur and this law has very few exceptions.  This is an important foundation of the criminal justice system. The release of this videotape is a violation of a court order. Publicity like this does not automatically trigger a change of venue nor does it change the ability of citizens to fairly and objectively asses a defendant's guilt or innocence in a court of law.

Copyright 2016 KMOV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

Watch News 4 Now

Mouse over player for controls · LAUNCH FULL PLAYER

Powered by Frankly