MSD making preparations for flooding - KMOV.com

MSD making preparations for flooding

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With frequent rain in the forecast, storm drains prevent flooding. With frequent rain in the forecast, storm drains prevent flooding.
With frequent rain in the forecast, storm drains prevent flooding. With frequent rain in the forecast, storm drains prevent flooding.
With frequent rain in the forecast, storm drains prevent flooding. With frequent rain in the forecast, storm drains prevent flooding.

ST. LOUIS, Mo. (KMOV.com) -June has brought a series of storms through the News 4 viewing area, and each rainfall brings with it a chance for flooding.

Storm drains were put in place to handle the gallons of rainwater that fall during storms, but if the drains get backed up, flooding could occur.

”We do place a big emphasis on making sure the sanitary system, the storm water sewers are free and clear of debris,” said Sean Hadley, spokesman for Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD).

The MSD showed News 4 how crews vacuum out debris washed down sewer drains. Debris ranging from grass clippings to trash to hubcaps can block up the drains.

”In a big rain event, if it's not free and clear, you're going to have backups within the system. We want to make sure the system is flowing constantly without obstructions in there,” said Hadley.

Crews perform sewer drain maintenance, but increase the amount of maintenance during periods of forecasts filled with rain.

MSD said it also has crews at pumping stations along the riverfront to pump the extra rainwater out. Without that help, MSD said the system will back up.

“What we're trying to do is stop potential inland flooding in the city so people can go about their daily lives and not worry about whether the river's flooding or not,” said Jay Kniker a pump station engineer.

When the river level gets higher than the regular outlets that flow into it, MSD has to turn on the pumps to get rid of the excess water. The pumps can move two billion gallons of water into the Mississippi per day.

“When we do our jobs well, you don't even notice us. That's a great day for us,” Kniker said.

The river is not quite at the level where the pumps are needed. MSD said shifts at the pumping stations will begin at 6:00 a.m. Tuesday.

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