Doctor Oz linked to weight loss supplement that may not work - KMOV.com

Doctor Oz linked to weight loss supplement that may not work

Posted: Updated:
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 21: Mehmet Oz speaks during a rehearsal before a taping of  Jeopardy! Power Players Week at DAR Constitution Hall on April 21, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Kris Connor/Getty Images) By Adam McDonald WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 21: Mehmet Oz speaks during a rehearsal before a taping of Jeopardy! Power Players Week at DAR Constitution Hall on April 21, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Kris Connor/Getty Images) By Adam McDonald

(KMOV.com) – A company that worked with Doctor Oz is now paying $9 million dollars in settlements after many people say the weight loss pills they endorsed didn’t work.

Doctor Oz was called before a U.S Senate Panel back in 2014 under allegations that he endorsed a green coffee bean extract which promised weight loss without dieting or exercising.

Read here: Dr. Oz scolded at hearing on weight loss scams

However, Doctor Oz remained adamant that he never endorses products. "I've taken a number of measures to deal with this problem and protect my viewers," Oz said. He says ads that promote him are used without his permission. 

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill didn't believe Oz. She quoted him during the hearing saying, "Quote, 'Garcinia Cambogia, it may be the simple solution you've been looking for to bust your body fat for good.' I don't get why you have to say this stuff because you know it's not true."

Oz, however said he used "language that was very passionate" and admits it was "not helpful and ended up being incendiary and provided fodder for unscrupulous advertisers." The doctor also admitted he received thousands of viewer complaints on the subject.

The company that is pushing the pill with the doctor has agreed to pay $9 million dollars to consumers in a settlement. 

Read here: NYC lawsuit filed against Dr. Oz over sleep tip

"I mean really, the bottom line is controlling your diet and exercising," said St. Louis University Nutritionist Rabia Rahman. "That is the magic answer that we are looking for."

There is no such thing as a magic pill.

Powered by Frankly