New study shows no link between early vaccinations, autism - KMOV.com

New study shows no link between early vaccinations, autism

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By KMOV Web Producer By KMOV Web Producer

(KMOV.com) -- Many parents are concerned about the number of vaccinations children receive in the first years of life, but a new study suggests the practice does not increase the risk of autism.

An estimated one in 10 parents refuse or delay vaccinations over concerns they may cause autism, despite a lack of scientific evidence linking the two.

A new study in the Journal of Pediatrics suggests getting multiple vaccines before age 2 does not increase the risk of autism.

Local pediatricians say it's best to follow the recommended vaccination schedule.

"Vaccination saves lives," said Jessica Sessions, a pediatrician at the William F. Ryan Center. "When you have a family that doesn't want vaccination or wants to delay the schedule of vaccination, you are putting your baby or child at risk of something that could be prevented."

In 1998, a small British study suggested a connection between the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and increased rates of autism. Later studies have not duplicated these results, and the study was later retracted by its publication.

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