Library of Congress releases this year's list of movies to be pr - KMOV.com

Library of Congress releases this year's list of movies to be preserved forever

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This undated black-and-white handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a scene from the movie "The Empire Strikes Back." The film is one 25 selections to the 2010 National Film Registry. (AP Photo/Library of Congress) By KMOV Web Producer This undated black-and-white handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a scene from the movie "The Empire Strikes Back." The film is one 25 selections to the 2010 National Film Registry. (AP Photo/Library of Congress) By KMOV Web Producer
This undated handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a scene from the movie "Airplane." The film is one 25 selections to the 2010 National Film Registry. (AP Photo/Library of Congress) By KMOV Web Producer This undated handout photo provided by the Library of Congress shows a scene from the movie "Airplane." The film is one 25 selections to the 2010 National Film Registry. (AP Photo/Library of Congress) By KMOV Web Producer

 

(CBS)-- John Travolta's disco moves can now be studied for generations to come in "Saturday Night Fever."
 
That is just one of the movies the Library of Congress chose to be preserved forever.
 
The Library of Congress released its annual list of 25 films that will be added to the National Film Registry Tuesday.
 
More than 2,000 movies were nominated.
 
The library chooses 25 significant films each year for its National Film Registry.
 
"The Exorcist" made the list, one of the most influential horror films of all time.
 
"McCabe and Mrs. Miller," which reinvented the Western, did too.
 
There are comedies like "The Pink Panther" and "Airplane," and "Saturday Night Fever," which is said to have created a whole new kind of movie-musical.
 
With this year's selection there are now 550 movies in the National Film Registry. That is more than the Library of Congress can store in Washington, so it built a special cold-storage facility in Virginia. It now holds over a million films.
 
Among this year's rare gems: one of the first motion pictures ever made called "Newark Athlete" from 1891, and a San Francisco film from 1906, shot a month before an earthquake devastated the city.
 
The complete list of films can be found at the Library of Congress website, www.loc.gov/film.

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