A look at bills that failed in the Mo. Legislature - KMOV.com

A look at bills that failed in the Mo. Legislature

Missouri lawmakers wrapped up their 2010 session Friday. Here are some of the bills that failed to pass.
  
BUSINESS INCENTIVES
   Various proposals would have created new tax incentives for manufacturers that retain jobs by improving their factories; granted Missouri businesses an edge in getting existing tax incentives; and used a portion of the taxes from technology companies to recruit other such firms.
  
CONCEALED GUNS
   The minimum age for getting a permit to carry a concealed gun would have been lowered from 23 to 21 years old.
  
DRUG TESTING
   People receiving state cash assistance would have been required to pass drug tests or lose benefits, and elected state officials would have faced a similar requirement.
  
EDUCATION MERGER
   The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and Department of Higher Education would have been combined and governed by a single board.
  
ELECTIONS
   Proposals would have allowed a no-excuses-needed early-voting period before Election Day and authorized a requirement that Missourians show a government-issued photo ID to vote.
  
HOLIDAYS
   Missouri would have eliminated state holidays for Truman Day on May 8 and Lincoln Day on Feb. 12, as part of an effort to save money in the budget.
  
HORSE SLAUGHTER
   Lawmakers dropped an attempt to open a market for horse slaughter in Missouri by charging fees that would be used to pay for federal inspections.
  
RETIREMENT
   State workers first hired in 2011 would have been required to contribute 4 percent of their pay to the retirement system and would not have been eligible for retirement until later than allowed under current law.
  
SCHOOL FUNDING
   Differing versions would have set up a system for distributing money to public K-12 schools when state money falls short of the amount called for under a school funding formula. Other proposals would have reduced state spending on summer school.
  
TAX CHANGES
   A proposed constitutional amendment would have eliminated the state individual and corporate income tax and replaced it with a higher sales tax charged on a wider variety of goods and services.
  
TAX CREDITS
   Gov. Jay Nixon, senators and House Democrats pushed for new limits on state tax credits, but House Republicans refused to consider the reductions.
  
TEXTING WHILE DRIVING
   Several measures sought to ban all Missouri drivers from sending cell phone text messages while driving. Currently, only people 21 years old or younger are banned from texting while driving.
   (Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

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