Tigers need stronger performance in first half

Tigers need stronger performance in first half

Credit: AP Photo

Missouri's Earnest Ross, left, loses the ball as he battles teammate Laurence Bowers, right, and Nicholls State's Fred Hunter, center, during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, in Columbia, Mo. Missouri won the game 74-54. (AP Photo/L.G. Patterson)

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by Dan Greenwald / Missouri Basketball App

KMOV.com

Posted on November 17, 2012 at 12:15 AM

Updated Tuesday, Nov 20 at 2:14 PM

(MISSOURI BASKETBALL APP)-- Despite the small sample size, it is important to point out the flaws on this team. One such characteristic has been slow starts. The Tigers will need to improve their play in the first half if they want to be successful in the Battle 4 Atlantis Tournament in the Bahamas next week.

In their first three games, the Tigers shot somewhere in the neighborhood of 40 percent in the first half. That stat on its own is not bad (actually it Is fairly solid but it could be better).  At halftime they have led by an average of 6.6 points. This is another stat that overall is satisfactory but must improve against better competition.

The early stages of the first three games been filled with missed easy buckets inside, and missed open medium range shots that could pad that stat and pad Mizzou’s lead at halftime.

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This has all been offset by excellent performances in the second half. The first three wins have been blowouts with an average margin of victory of 23.6 points.

Mizzou will be facing better competition in Nassau. The team opens play in the Caribbean against Stanford, but there is a very good chance the opponents will get tougher as the week wears on. After facing the Cardinal, the Tigers could either face Northern Iowa or #2 Louisville, and could possibly close out their trip against #9 Duke.

Poor first half showings against the above mentioned teams could cause the Tigers to dig themselves in a hole that might be too big to climb out of.

 

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