Thursday's Sports In Brief

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Associated Press

Posted on August 16, 2013 at 4:00 AM

Updated Friday, Aug 16 at 4:06 AM

BASEBALL

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) — Calling it a historic moment, Commissioner Bud Selig said Major League Baseball plans to expand its video review process next season, giving managers a tool they've never had in an effort to dramatically reduce the number of incorrect calls made in games.

Selig made the announcement after two days of meetings with representatives of the 30 teams. The proposal is to be voted on by the owners in November.

A 75 percent vote by the owners is needed for approval, and the players' association and umpires would have to agree to any changes to the current system. But the announcement was met with mostly praise at ballparks across the country.

PRO FOOTBALL

NEW YORK (AP) — The "final hurdle" to testing players for HGH this season apparently involves the NFL and union agreeing on whether Commissioner Roger Goodell will hear appeals for violations other than a positive test, according to a person who works for the league.

The person sent an email to The Associated Press to update the status of negotiations between the league and the NFL Players Association.

The person said that while several issues standing in the way of HGH testing have been resolved, "the final hurdle appears to be" the union's desire to have someone other than Goodell rule on appeals that involve violations of the law or "demonstrated use" of a performance-enhancing substance without a positive test.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

NEW YORK (AP) — If Johnny Manziel did violate NCAA rules by receiving money for signing autographs, a Texas law could put the people who allegedly paid him at risk of being sued by Texas A&M.

The state of Texas passed legislation in 1987 to make "a person who violates a rule of a national collegiate athletic association ... liable for damages in an action brought by an institution." To be liable, the person must have known or reasonably should have known a rule was violated and the violation must lead to disciplinary action against the student or institution."

Manziel, who became the first freshman to win the Heisman last year, is being investigated by the NCAA. ESPN has reported it is for possibly receiving payment from memorabilia brokers for signing autographs in Florida, Connecticut and Texas this year. If he is found to have been paid for signing, it could compromise is amateur status and put his eligibility at risk.

HOCKEY

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — The new owners of the New Jersey Devils are keeping long-time executive Lou Lamoriello in charge of hockey operations, bringing in a new business team and committing to make the three-time Stanley Cup champions an organization looked toward as a model of excellence.

Philadelphia 76ers owner Josh Harris and business partner David Blitzer bought the Devils and the lease to the Prudential Center from Jeff Vanderbeek for $320 million.

The deal was delayed roughly 15 minutes in the morning because attorneys needed more time to sign off on the transfer of the financially strapped NHL team, which the league's board of governor approved on Wednesday.

Harris dispelled rumors that he might consider moving the 76ers to Newark. He has a lease at the Wells Fargo Center with Comcast Spectacor, which also owns the NHL's Flyers.

GOLF

GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) — Chris Stroud and Ross Fisher each shot 6-under 64 to share the first-round lead in the Wyndham Championship.

Eight players — defending champion Sergio Garcia, Matt Jones, Robert Garrigus, Jordan Spieth, Trevor Immelman, Morgan Hoffman, Patrick Reed and Andrew Svoboda — shot 65.

John Senden and Stuart Appleby were among the five players at 66 at the final tournament before golf's postseason begins next week.

Stroud had eight birdies during his best round of the year, which came at the Donald Ross-designed course that had vexed him through the previous five years. It was the highest score for an opening-round leader since the tournament returned to Sedgefield Country Club in 2008.

GYMNASTICS

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Simone Biles grabbed the early lead in the U.S. women's gymnastics championships.

The 16-year-old from Texas put together an all-around score of 60.500 on in the opening round, well ahead of returning Olympic gold medalist Kyla Ross. Ross, who helped the U.S. women win the team gold in London last summer, was second at 59.750. Brenna Dowell was third, followed by Peyton Ernst and Maggie Nichols.

McKayla Maroney, who won two medals in London, posted the highest score on vault in her first major competition since undergoing a series of leg surgeries last fall. Maroney averaged 15.5 on her two vaults, edging Biles by a tenth of a point.

SAILING

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Skipper Max Sirena of Italy's Luna Rossa is the latest America's Cup competitor to accuse defending champion Oracle Team USA of cheating in what potentially could be one of the biggest scandals in the regatta's 162-year history.

"For sure," Sirena said when asked at a news conference if he thought the defenders are cheaters.

Oracle Team USA last week acknowledged its boats were modified without permission of the Measurement Committee for four America's Cup World Series regattas last year, which were warm-ups to the 34th America's Cup.

An international jury is investigating and can sanction Oracle Team USA, including a fine, reduction in the number of sails it can use, forfeiture of races or disqualification from the America's Cup.

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