Megatron presents a mega problem for Rams secondary

Megatron presents a mega problem for Rams secondary

Credit: Getty Images

BALTIMORE, MD - AUGUST 17: Calvin Johnson #81 of the Detroit Lions warms up prior to the start of the Lions game against the Baltimore Ravens at M&T Bank Stadium on August 17, 2012 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

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by Scott Bierman / FootballStL

KMOV.com

Posted on September 8, 2012 at 12:25 PM

Updated Friday, Sep 7 at 12:29 PM

ST. LOUIS (FootballStL) -- There are not many players as gifted as Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson.  There is also not many players who can stop him and Johnson, himself, doesn’t seem to know how to either.

“You have to ask the person that stops me,” Johnson said.

In five seasons as a pro, Johnson, nicknamed Megatron, has accumulated 49 touchdowns and 5,872 receiving yards, 1,681 of which came last season.  The Rams may have to pin cornerback Cortland Finnegan to his hip if the secondary stands any chance of slowing Johnson down.

“I played against him a couple of years ago,” Johnson said of Finnegan.  “On film – quick, kind of instinctive and all the other stuff everybody knows about.  I’m not worried about that. He’s got some quickness, though, I’ll give him that.”

Johnson is sure to get the secondary’s attention along with the Rams coaches.

“What I understand from the young man, he (Johnson) is a real pro, too.  A worker, you can see it on the field so he is a tremendous challenge for anybody that he goes against,” Rams assistant head coach Dave McGinnis said.  “And of course that’s the great part of this business is that you play against the best athletes in the world at their position and this guy certainly qualifies.”

According to Lions head coach Jim Schwartz, Johnson is worth every penny he makes.  The star wide receiver struck it big last March after signing an eight-year, $132 million deal.

“I said this when we gave him his contract extension: I said, ‘As good a player as he is – everybody recognizes what a good player he is – it’s easy to watch a game and see him make a great catch or run past somebody or make a good block or everything that he does for our team. But what you don’t see is he is a better person and a better teammate than he is a player,’” Schwartz told the St. Louis media on Wednesday.
 

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