Tuesday's Sports In Brief

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Associated Press

Posted on May 15, 2013 at 2:00 AM

Updated Wednesday, May 15 at 2:02 AM

BASEBALL

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Bryce Harper arrived at Dodger Stadium a little bit smarter.

Less than 24 hours earlier, the 20-year-old Washington Nationals slugger ran headfirst into the right-field wall while chasing a fly ball. The violent collision left him with 11 stitches in his chin, a sore body and a lesson learned.

Harper vowed to keep playing hard, but said he will learn how to avoid crashing into the fence with such force. He was set to sit out the remaining two games of Washington's series against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Harper acknowledged feeling nauseous and "a little carsick" on Tuesday. "But there is no concussion or anything like that," he said.

NEW YORK (AP) — While Major League Baseball teams improved racial diversity in hiring senior administrators, the employment of women is still lagging, according to the annual report by Richard Lapchick's Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports at the University of Central Florida.

Racial diversity among senior team administrators improved to 19.9 percent from 17 percent.

MLB's central offices have 30.8 percent people of color. The sport's overall score of 92.5 points equaled its top mark in 2010, and racial hiring received an A grade for the fifth straight year. Gender hiring remained a C+, with its points increasing from 75.2 to 76.6. Gender hiring improved from a D to a C among senior team administration, but it remained an F among team vice presidents.

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PRO FOOTBALL

METAIRIE, La. (AP) — Chuck Muncie, a Pro Bowl running back with both the New Orleans Saints and San Diego Chargers, has died at age 60, the NFL clubs and a family spokesman said.

Muncie family spokesman Vintage Foster of AMF Media Group in San Ramon, Calif., said Muncie died at his Los Angeles-area home on Monday from heart failure.

Muncie was the Saints' first-round pick, third overall, out of California in 1976. He played 4½ seasons in New Orleans before being traded in 1980 to San Diego, where he finished his nine-year NFL career.

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Chargers outside linebacker Melvin Ingram has torn the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee, putting his season in jeopardy.

The Chargers announced that Ingram was hurt during an organized team activity practice. San Diego did not immediately release any other details. Ingram was the Chargers' first-round pick — 18th overall — out of South Carolina in last year's NFL draft. He started just one game and had one sack, 16 tackles and a forced fumble.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Donovan McNabb will retire with the Philadelphia Eagles this fall.

The six-time Pro Bowl quarterback led the Eagles to four NFC championship games and a Super Bowl loss in 11 seasons before he was traded to Washington in 2010. McNabb went 92-49-1 with the Eagles and holds franchise records for completions (2801), passing yards (32,873) and passing touchdowns (216).

McNabb announced these plans on ESPN Radio 97.7 FM in Syracuse and later on his NBC Sports Radio show.

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PRO BASKETBALL

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Philadelphia 76ers hired former Houston executive Sam Hinkie as team president and general manager.

Hinkie was the executive vice president of basketball operations for the Rockets, and was the top choice by owner Joshua Harris to oversee the rebuilding of this beleaguered franchise. He is an analytics disciple and spoke in March at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference.

Hinkie must now hire a coach after Doug Collins resigned following three seasons. Collins and former Rod Thorn are officially consultants for the team, but are now in the background of a major reconstruction project that Harris, Hinkie and a new coach will tackle. Philadelphia went 34-48 last season.

CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) — Kobe Bryant and an auction house that wants to sell memorabilia from his high school days and early pro career are heading for a trial next month, unless they can work out a deal before then.

U.S. District Judge Renee Bumb on Monday set June 17 as a trial date, but also set a court-guided mediation session for Friday in a case that's the manifestation of an ugly family dispute that all sides seem to want to resolve quickly. The main reason she didn't schedule the trial for an earlier date was that Bryant's father, Joe "Jellybean" Bryant, said he could not get to a trial sooner because he's coaching a Thai team in the Asian Basketball League playoffs.

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COLLEGE BASKETBALL

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP) — Top prep basketball prospect Andrew Wiggins told a small gathering of family and friends at his high school gym that he will play at Kansas.

Then the Huntington Prep star signed his letter-of-intent and officially became a Jayhawk. No big speech. No bands, live TV coverage or props. Just the way Wiggins wanted it. And just like that, Lawrence, Kan., became more of a focal point for the upcoming college basketball season.

The 6-foot-8 Toronto native chose Kansas over Kentucky, North Carolina and Florida State. Wiggins said there wasn't one particular selling point, taking into account each school's coaching staff, players and program.

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AUTO RACING

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Zak Brown has turned down an offer to join the IndyCar Series, choosing instead to remain with the motorsports marketing company he founded.

Brown told The Associated Press he informed Hulman & Co. CEO Mark Miles of his decision not to take a job with IndyCar. He'll instead relocate in July to England to continue the growth of his Zionsville, Ind.-based agency, Just Marketing International.

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WRESTLING

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — American, Iranian and Russian wrestlers hope their unity will sway the IOC to keep their sport in the Olympics.

The three nations with often tense relations off the mat will compete in an exhibition at Manhattan's Grand Central Terminal on Wednesday. They appeared together Tuesday at the United Nations to talk up the value of wrestling. The International Olympic Committee has recommended the sport be dropped for the 2020 Games.

This is the fourth straight year a major wrestling exhibition has been held at a famous New York City locale to raise money for charity. But the event takes on an added significance after February's unexpected IOC decision.

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HOCKEY

FRISCO, Texas (AP) — Glen Gulutzan couldn't end the longest playoff drought in franchise history for the Dallas Stars and the second-year coach didn't hold the option on the remaining season in his contract.

When the general manager who hired him was dumped two weeks ago, Gulutzan's firing looked like the inevitable next step in an overhaul of the staff and it came Tuesday in an announcement from new general manager Jim Nill. He nevertheless said the move wasn't a foregone conclusion in his mind.

"That's why this process took so long," Nill said. "I needed to do my homework. I needed to get to know everybody. It's tough when you come into a new situation. I wanted to be fair to everyone."

The Stars missed the playoffs in both of Gulutzan's seasons, making it five straight years without a postseason trip for a franchise that crammed 73 playoff games into a four-year stretch a little more than a decade ago.

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SOCCER

A Seattle man trying to dribble a soccer ball 10,000 miles to Brazil in time for the 2014 World Cup died after being hit by a pickup truck on the Oregon Coast.

Police in Lincoln City, Ore., said 42-year-old Richard Swanson was hit at about 10 a.m. while walking south along U.S. Highway 101 near the city limits. He was declared dead at a hospital. The driver has not been charged.

Lt. Jerry Palmer said investigators found materials among Swanson's belongings listing his website, breakawaybrazil.com. Swanson set out on the trek to promote the One World Futbol Project, based in Berkeley, Calif., which donates durable blue soccer balls to people in developing countries.

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