Vaughn: Carpenter doesn't know how to quit

Vaughn: Carpenter doesn't know how to quit

Credit: Getty Images

ST. LOUIS - OCTOBER 04: Starting pitcher, Chris Carpenter #29 of the St. Louis Cardinals leaves the game in the seventh inning due to hand cramping caused by dehydration during Game One of the National League Divison Series against the San Diego Padres at Busch Stadium on October 4, 2005 in St. Louis, Missouri. Carpenter was replaced with pitcher Brad Thompson. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

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by Doug Vaughn / Baseball StL

KMOV.com

Posted on February 11, 2013 at 5:51 PM

Updated Friday, Nov 1 at 10:55 PM

(Baseball StL) -- Anyone who thought Chris Carpenter would make a retirement announcement today just doesn’t know him very well.

It might make sense for some other 37 year old pitcher who’s been battling arm injuries through-out his 15 year career, but not Chris Carpenter. Quitting isn’t in his vocabulary. 

“I definitely think that there is a little bit of hope there,” he said this morning. “I mean, with everything that’s come out, it obviously was news that Mo and the organization and myself wasn’t expecting. But it is what it is. I have to figure out what’s going on. I think that after all the Spring Training stuff that’s going on down there—with doctors and physicals and those sort of things—when our physicians get back there, that’s when I’m going to go in and get reevaluated and see what’s going on ... and make sure there’s been no change, that there’s nothing else going on in there.”

Carpenter was excited about the way his off season workouts were going, right up until he tried to throw off a mound. That’s when the nerve problems began bothering him again. He felt numbness in his arm and pain and bruising in his right hand. 

“I need to make sure that, one, my arm is healthy. The hand thing kind of concerned me a little bit—because that has to deal with circulation, and we weren’t dealing with that before, we were dealing with nerve stuff, and I want to be able to use my arm later on in my life. So we’re going to take a step back, we’re going to let the guys do what they are doing down there for physicals, and when they get back we’ll get together and talk about it.”

Carpenter has endured eight surgeries over his career. He says he’s had enough of that. If he can’t pitch without having another surgery, his career will be over. But he hasn’t given up hope yet. “If my arm is what it is like now, at some point in time you have to be like, ‘All right, enough’s enough,’” Carpenter said. “You can only push it so much. I can’t pitch with the way that I feel right now. It’s not fair to anyone. I’m going to go ahead and rest it and wait until our guys get back. … We’ll just have to see what happens through time.

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