Feldman: Greene finally put out of his misery in St. Louis

Feldman: Greene finally put out of his misery in St. Louis

Feldman: Greene finally put out of his misery in St. Louis

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by Brian Feldman / News 4 Sports

KMOV.com

Posted on August 9, 2012 at 6:13 PM

ST. LOUIS (KMOV) -- It was frustrating for everyone.  Frustrating for fans.  Frustrating for the team.  Frustrating for the front office.  And, especially, frustrating for him.

Tyler Greene has about as much raw talent as anyone you’re going to find.  He’s big (6’2”, 190 lbs), he runs like the wind (25 out of 27 in stolen base attempts) and he’s strong (has reached Big Mac Land with ease). 

When scouts talk about tools and what they look for in a potential prospect...they’re talking about guys like Tyler Greene.  He’s got them all.  Size, speed, strength, etc, etc...

There’s just one problem.  Tools don’t play.  Tools don’t physically walk onto a baseball field and produce.  Tools don’t do the little things that make a player successful.

A person—who is fortunate enough to possess those tools—does.

And in 4 seasons (or parts of 4 seasons anyway) the former 1st round pick out of Georgia Tech never developed from “prospect” to “player”.  He teased the organization on a fairly regular basis with flashes of brilliance. 

Those moments bought him more and more and more time to show he could do it consistently.  That never happened.  Greene ended up with a .218 average in a Redbirds uniform over 495 at-bats (or virtually a full season’s worth) in addition to countless defensive mishaps.

It culminated with getting booed last night and then criticizing fans for doing so afterwards to reporters.

And now...just like that...he’s gone.

Traded to Houston for what amounts to nothing - a player to be named later or cash.  You could see this coming for months, heck, even years.  The 28-year old just wasn’t getting any better. 

It’s a reminder of just how difficult scouting is.  Just because someone runs fast, hits a baseball far and can throw it a mile does not in any way mean he can be a good and consistent player.

If you put Tyler Greene and David Eckstein on a field together and had them go through a workout a 6-year old would be able to tell that Greene’s got more raw talent.

Not that easy huh?  One’s a World Series MVP while the other is a AAA Hall of Famer but couldn’t even muster a .300 on-base percentage in the majors.

 

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