Facebook proposes to end voting on privacy issues

Facebook proposes to end voting on privacy issues

Credit: AFP/Getty Images

To go with focus story Indonesia-media-Internet by Presi Mandari Abdu Rauf, 12 year old Indonesian Facebook user, logs on at an internet shop in Jakarta on February 17, 2010. Indonesia is considering proposals to block internet sites that are deemed to violate "public decency" and privacy, provoking a barrage of criticism from bloggers and web users. The new rules would make it illegal to distribute or provide access to pornography or gambling services, anything that spreads religious hatred or threats, and any news deemed "misleading." AFP PHOTO / ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Print
Email
|

KMOV.com

Posted on November 21, 2012 at 2:53 PM

NEW YORK (AP) -- Facebook is proposing to end its practice of letting users vote on changes to its privacy policies. The company says it will continue to let users comment on proposed updates.

   The world's biggest social media company plans to announce Wednesday that its voting mechanism, which is triggered only if enough people comment on proposed changes, has become a system that emphasizes the quantity of responses over the quality of discussion.

   Facebook began letting users vote on privacy changes in 2009. Since then, it has gone public and its user base has ballooned from around 200 million to more than 1 billion. As part of the 2009 policy, users' votes only count if more than 30 percent of all Facebook's active users partake.
 

Print
Email
|