Eye implant can restore some vision in rare cases

Eye implant can restore some vision in rare cases

Credit: Getty Images

WISE, VA - JULY 25: A patient has her eyes checked by a vollunteer optomologist at the Remote Area Medical (RAM), healthcare clinic July 25, 2008 in Wise, Virginia. The free weekend clinic, staffed by more than 1,400 vollunteer doctors and medical personel, is the largest of its kind in the nation and organizers expect more than 2,500 patients to turn out for the 2 1/2 day event. Residents of the area, most from the "coal counties" of Appalachia, come from one of the poorest and least educated areas in the United States. Most are underinsured or have no healthcare at all, and for many the annual RAM event is the only medical treatment they may get all year. Health insurance for the disadvantaged has become one of the main issues in this year's presidential race. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

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KMOV.com

Posted on February 15, 2013 at 10:58 AM

Updated Friday, Feb 15 at 11:07 AM

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Patients who have lost their sight due to a rare disorder may be able to regain some vision using a new implantable device that takes the place of damaged cells inside the eye.

   The Food and Drug Administration approved the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System as the first treatment for an inherited disorder that causes the breakdown of cells in the retina, a membrane inside the eye.

   FDA says that while the device will not fully restore patients' vision, "it may allow them to detect light and dark in the environment."

   The system includes a small video camera and transmitter mounted on a pair of glasses. Images from the camera are processed into electronic data that is wirelessly transmitted to electrodes implanted into the patient's retina.
 

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