Photos: Scores killed in Philippines earthquake

Photos: Scores killed in Philippines earthquake

Credit: AFP/Getty Images

Rescuers try to uncover an unidentified man under slabs of cement in Cebu City, Philippines after a major 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck the region on October 15, 2013. At least 20 people were killed on October 15 when the earthquake tore down buildings across three islands that are among the Philippines' most popular tourist attractions, authorities said. AFP PHOTO / Chester Baldicanto (Photo credit should read Chester Baldicanto/AFP/Getty Images)

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by Associated Press

KMOV.com

Posted on October 15, 2013 at 7:23 AM

MANILA, PHILIPPINES—A 7.2-magnitude earthquake killed at least 85 people across the central Philippines on Tuesday, toppling buildings and historic churches and sending terrified residents into deadly stampedes.

Panic ensued as people spilled out on the street after the quake struck at 8:12 a.m. It was centered about 20 miles below Carmen town on Bohol Island, where many buildings collapsed, roads cracked up and bridges fell. Extensive damage also hit densely populated Cebu city, across the narrow strait from Bohol, causing deaths when a fish port and a market roof fell.

The quake set off a stampede in a Cebu gym where people lined up to receive government cash assistance, killing five and injuring eight others, said Neil Sanchez, provincial disaster management officer. In another city nearby, 18 people were injured in the scramble to get out of a shaking building where the assistance was being handed out.

Police in Bohol reported that 69 of the deaths came from the island, where the quake hit Tuesday morning near the town of Carmen. In densely populated Cebu, at least 15 people were killed, officials said. Scores more were injured and the search for survivors was ongoing.

“We ran out of the building, and outside, we hugged trees because the tremors were so strong,” said Vilma Yorong, a Bohol provincial government employee.

“When the shaking stopped, I ran to the street and there I saw several injured people. Some were saying their church has collapsed,” she told The Associated Press by phone.

As fear set in, Yorong and the others ran up a mountain, afraid a tsunami would follow the quake. “Minutes after the earthquake, people were pushing each other to go up the hill,” she said.

But the quake was centered inland and did not cause a tsunami.

Offices and schools were closed for a national holiday—the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha—which may have saved lives. The earthquake also was deeper below the surface than the 6.9-magnitude temblor last year in waters near Negros Island, also in the central Philippines, that killed nearly 100 people.

Aledel Cuizon, who works for a Finnish company in Cebu, said the quake that caught her in her bedroom sounded like “a huge truck that was approaching and the rumbling sound grew louder as it got closer.”

She and her neighbors ran outside, where she saw “the electric concrete poles were swaying like coconut trees.” She said it lasted 15-20 seconds.

Cebu city’s hospitals quickly evacuated patients in the streets, basketball courts and parks.

Cebu province, about 350 miles south of Manila, has a population of more than 2.6 million people. Cebu is the second largest city after Manila. Nearby Bohol has 1.2 million people and is popular among foreigners because of its beach and island resorts and the Chocolate Hills.

Many roads and bridges were reported damaged, but historic churches dating from the Spanish colonial period suffered the most. Among them is the country’s oldest, the 16th-century Basilica of the Holy Child in Cebu, which lost its bell tower.

A 17th-century limestone church in Loboc town, southwest of Carmen, crumbled to pieces, with nearly half of it reduced to rubble.

Regional military commander Lt. Gen. Roy Deveraturda said that he recalled soldiers from the holiday furlough to respond to the quake. He said it damaged the pier in Tagbilaran, Bohol’s provincial capital, and caused some cracks at Cebu’s international airport but that navy ships and air force planes could use alternative ports to help out.

Passenger flights resumed later Tuesday after officials checked runways and buildings for damage.

 

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