South County man sentenced to probation after running over woman

South County man sentenced to probation after running over woman

South County man sentenced to probation after running over woman

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by KMOV.com staff

KMOV.com

Posted on March 8, 2013 at 5:27 PM

Updated Saturday, Mar 9 at 12:07 AM

(KMOV) – News 4 looked into a criminal case on Friday involving a man who fractured a woman’s skull outside a south St. Louis County bar, then pleaded guilty to assault and sentenced to probation.

It all stems from a fight in the parking lot of Tequila’s restaurant on Lemay Ferry in south St. Louis County in January, 2012.

According to a St. Louis County police report, when an officer arrived at the parking lot of Tequila’s restaurant, the victim was barely conscious and incoherent.

Witnesses say Arnold Foppe, 42, had been drinking and was kicked out of the restaurant for being combative.

He drove out of the parking lot after a skirmish and grabbed a woman by the shirt, dragging her several feet. He then released her and she fell under the wheel. That’s when he ran over her head.

On the surface, it certainly sounds like it deserved something more than probation.

But a spokesperson with the county prosecutor’s office says several people involved in the skirmish in the parking lot were drinking that night, leading to some witnesses changing their stories.

The victim herself had  a blood alcohol content of .20. To put that into perspective, it is illegal to drive over .08 in the state of Missouri.

Foppe’s sentence includes restrictions on alcohol. He must get evaluation and treatment and wear an alcohol-monitoring device.

The spokesperson says overall the prosecutor’s office sees the sentence as a good result.

Jessica Meyers, who works with crime victims, said even though the victim herself was reportedly satisfied with the sentence, that may change eventually.

“Anytime they have to go before a hearing or hear about the perpetrator being finished with parole or probation or having a hearing, those can all be trigger events where they might realize this isn’t really what they had hoped,” said Meyers. “The person isn’t being punished as much as they had hoped.”

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