Is Sylvia Browne really a psychic?

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KMOV.com

Posted on May 14, 2010 at 10:45 AM

Updated Wednesday, May 19 at 9:31 PM

Poll:
Do you think Sylvia Browne is a psychic?

(KMOV) -- Is Sylvia Browne really the psychic she claims to be? For a couple of years now, News 4 has been investigating her claims.

She recently came back to St. Louis for a series of appearances, so News 4 went to check her out.

 News 4’s Craig Cheatham also traveled to California to get exclusive details about Browne and her business operation.
 
In St. Louis, a huge crowd waited in long lines to pack into Sylvia Browne's show.
 
She made predictions and seemed to tell many of her adoring fans what they wanted to hear.
 
Over the years, Browne has repeatedly failed on her most publicized predictions, including her statement that Sean Hornbeck, a missing 11-year-old from Washington County, Missouri, was dead. It was a prediction she shared with Sean's parents on the “Montel Williams Show.” Four years later, Sean was found alive.
 
Two years ago, during another appearance in St. Louis, News 4 asked Browne about the Hornbeck case, but she refused to comment.
 
Last week, News 4 traveled to Sylvia Browne's world headquarters in Campbell, California to see what we could learn about America's most famous self-proclaimed psychic.
 
Inside the small office space, longtime Business Manager Linda Rossi showed us hundreds of files filled with claims that reportedly bear witness to Browne's accurate and life-changing revelations. Rossi also took us into Sylvia Browne's private office.
 
Browne has a 3-year waiting list for in-person readings, but she'll still give you 20-30 minutes on the phone for $800.
 
Although Rossi says the three Browne related organizations bring in $3 million a year, revenues are down more than 50-percent, and Browne's headquarters will soon move to a much smaller building.
 
There seemed to be little sign of trouble as more than a thousand fans paid at least $50 to see Sylvia Browne in St. Louis, but Rossi insists the three day event netted less than $10,000.

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