Feldman: The sleeping giant that is the Cards offense has woken up

Feldman: The sleeping giant that is the Cards offense has woken up

Credit: Getty Images

CINCINNATI, OH - AUGUST 4: Jon Jay #19 of the St. Louis Cardinals hits a single in the first inning against the Cincinnati Reds at Great American Ball Park on August 4, 2013 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Jay would go on to score the first run in the first inning. (Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images)

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by Brian Feldman/ BaseballSTL

KMOV.com

Posted on August 4, 2013 at 2:50 PM

Updated Sunday, Aug 4 at 3:49 PM

(BaseballSTL) -- 10 runs in a week long losing streak, huh?  Worried this offense would fall apart at the seams down the stretch, eh?  Hogwash.  Hitting coach John Mabry and the Redbirds bats have proven in a very short time period of time that seven game losing streak in which the offense appeared to lose steam was nothing more than a mirage.
 
In just four games since then the Cards bats have pounded out 44 runs on 54 hits.  Think about that.  44 runs on 54 hits in just four games.  That's an average of 11 runs and 13 and a half hits per game.  To make it even more ridiculous sounding that four game span also includes a one game dud in the middle where they lost 8-3 to the Reds while managing just four hits.
 
So in three wins in four games since the big losing streak, the Cards have 41 runs and 50 hits.  Insane, right?  And that's without catcher Yadier Molina.
 
These Redbirds have proven beyond a shadow of doubt that when the pitching is not there on a given day the offense is more than capable of carrying them to a win.  This isn't as if they're solely dependent on the pitching staff to go out and throw a gem otherwise they're doomed.
 
Heck, even in 2011 when they went on to win the World Series the offense had some significant lulls throughout the regular season.  And if you remember, if was that same offense that carried the team through October and all the way to a championship.
 
Hitting is hard.  It's effectively trying to hit a round ball with a round bat squared.  All in all, it's probably the hardest thing to do in sports.  No one can fail as much as these guys do yet still be considered the best in the world at a particular skill.  You're going to have down times in the year.  It happens to, quite literally, everyone.  Even the 1927 Yankees had some bad games at the plate.
 
The key is to keep those rough patches to a minimum and end them as fast as possible once they start.  Those are the championship teams.
 
And the Cardinals seem to have an offense fully capable of doing just that.

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