2014 Ill. governor’s candidates on minimum wage

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by Associated Press

KMOV.com

Posted on January 17, 2014 at 5:42 PM

Updated Friday, Jan 17 at 6:22 PM

CHICAGO (AP) -- The question of raising the minimum wage, both in Illinois and nationally, has emerged as a significant 2014 campaign issue. Gov. Pat Quinn and other Democrats are pushing to raise the state’s minimum wage of $8.25 per hour, and most Republicans oppose the idea, arguing it could push employers to actually cut jobs. The federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour.

Here are edited excerpts of what Illinois’ six gubernatorial candidates told The Associated Press about where they stand on the issue:

DEMOCRATS:

GOV. PAT QUINN, CHICAGO: “People are making $8.25 an hour in Illinois. That’s not enough in my book ... How are we going to treat folks in our society who do some of the hardest jobs imaginable, get paid very, very modest wages we need to raise?”

TIO HARDIMAN, HILLSIDE: “The minimum wage should be raised to at least $12.00 per hour. However, we have to eliminate the (corporate) Head Tax or cut the Head Tax by 50 percent in Illinois before increasing the minimum wage.”

REPUBLICANS:

STATE SEN. BILL BRADY, BLOOMINGTON: “I believe the state and federal minimum wage rates need to be paired. I support a moratorium on increases in the Illinois minimum wage until such a time that the federal rate has caught up with our state rate.”

STATE SEN. KIRK DILLARD, HINSDALE: “In an environment where jobs could possibly be negatively impacted, increasing the minimum wage is unwise ... Illinois cannot take the chance that more people will be out of work because of a minimum wage increase. Small businesses will be impacted the most and these are the very businesses that employ the bulk of Illinois residents.”

BUSINESSMAN BRUCE RAUNER, WINNETKA: “Without action from Washington (to raise the federal minimum wage), I would favor increasing Illinois’ minimum wage if we also adopt creative solutions to avoid further damage to our state’s already shattered business climate. That can be done by providing incentives to small businesses to help offset the added costs. It can be done through workers’ compensation reform, tort reform and elimination of other impediments to job growth.”

STATE TREASURER DAN RUTHERFORD, CHENOA: “I believe every American should be able to make as much money as possible, legally and ethically. State government should not put an artificial cost of doing business, increase on a business, church or local unit of government.”

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