Dieters move past calories, food makers follow

Dieters move past calories, food makers follow

Credit: AP

FILE - In this July 18, 2008 file photo, calories of each food item appear on a McDonalds drive-thru menu in New York. Like it or not, many restaurant diners will soon know more about what they are eating under menu labeling requirements proposed Friday by the Food and Drug Administration. The requirements will force chain restaurants with 20 or more locations, along with bakeries, grocery stores, convenience stores and coffee chains, to clearly post the amount of calories in each item on menus, both in restaurants and drive-through lanes. The new rules will also apply to vending machines where calorie information isn't already visible on the package. (AP Photo/Ed Ou, File)

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by CANDICE CHOI AP Food Industry Writer

KMOV.com

Posted on April 10, 2014 at 9:35 AM

NEW YORK (AP) -- Obsessing over calories alone is becoming passe.

The calorie counting that defined dieting for so long is giving way to other considerations, like the promise of more fiber or natural ingredients. That is chipping away at the popularity of products like Diet Coke, Lean Cuisine and Special K, which became weight-watching staples primarily by stripping calories from people’s favorite foods.

Part of the problem: “Low-calorie” foods make people feel deprived. Now, people now want to lose weight while still feeling satisfied. And they want to do it without foods they consider processed.

In the past four years, sales of 100-calorie snack packs of Oreos have plummeted 72 percent, according to market research firm IRI. And Frito-Lay also made its last shipment of 100-calorie pack Cheetos and Doritos this past summer.

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